Practitioners 39: Adam Hughes

Adam Hughes (born May 5th 1967 in Riverside Township, New Jersey) is an American comic book artist wwho has worked for compnaies such as DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Dark Horse Comics, Lucasfilm, Warner Bros. Pictures, Playboy Magazine, Joss Whedon’s Mutant Enemy Productions and Sideshow Collectibles. He is undoubtedly known to American Comic book readers for his renderings of pin-up style female characters and his cover artwork for titles such as Wonder Woman and Catwoman. A specialist in defining the female form, Hughes is an true artist, capable of creating works of fine art freehand at con tables as well as through digital painting and drawing.

Hughes had no formal training in art, beginning his career in 1987, pencilling two short stories and the first issue of Death Hawk, created by Mark Ellis. In 1988, Hughe’s work found its way into Comico’s Maze Agency written by Mike W. Barr and remained on the book for one year. When that title ended (cancelled by Comico), Dc offered Hughes a position drawing Justice League America. Completing both covers and internal artwork to begin with, Hughes moved to just covers only after two years.

At the age of 24, Hughes moved to Atlanta, Georgia in order to join Gaijin Studios, believing that working more closely with fellow artists would improve his own skills. He remained with Gaijin Studios for 12 years.

He followed this with a short stint on Dark Horse comics’ Ghost, Penthouse comix, legionaires and Playstation magazine. Although Hughes wrote and illustrated the interiors of 1996 two-isssue miniseries Gen 13: Ordinary Heroes for Wildstorm, this took him 10 months, cementing his feeling that he should remain as a poster and cover artist. In late 1996 he began a five year run as cover artist on DC Comics Wonder Woman as well as providing cover artwork for Tomb Raider at Top Cow Comics.

When the Star Wars RPG (Role Playing Game) was created by Wizards of the Coast, Hughes created designs for both the original and revised core rule books. When he reused his artwork of Jedi Guardian Sia-Lan Wezz for the cover of Star Wars: Purge the fan response was so great that she was introduced as one of Darth Vader’s early victims.

Talk of an All Star Wonder Woman 6 issue series continues as the Catwoman cover run ended at issue 82 in favour of completing the project (according to an interview at San Diego Comiccon). However, he has explained in subsequent interviews that the project is effectively in ‘the freezer’.

Regardless of what Hughes produces or believes himself (he worked for a short while for Playboy in order to be sure that if the comic book work dried up he still had publications willing to continue to hire him) his work will always be in demand. A nice guy who takes time to respond to almost all deviantart messages he receives he is responsible for some of the finest bodies of work in comic books. A master of anatomy and portraits he is as adept at painting a Jedi in full armour as a voluptuous superheroine ripping her bodice. Elevating the art of erotica to accessible and intelligent levels, Hughes imbeds wry humour into his work, keeping it from ever appearing demeaning or smutty. He imeds intelligence and character into his femme fatales, each one a striking, dominant, strong character, standing there with very few clothes on…

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3 thoughts on “Practitioners 39: Adam Hughes

  1. Pingback: Is the DC Relaunch Sexist? « Beyond the Bunker

  2. Pingback: Practitioners 54: J H Williams III « Beyond the Bunker

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