Practitioners 40: Dan Jurgens

Now, let’s make this clear. Dan Jurgens killed Superman. There were others involved of course, talented individuals -each with their own individual styles, across the four titkes of the time – most of whom will appear here. The editorial team was monitoring the whole process as well – however, one man wrote and illustrated the moment the man of Steel and his mysterious opponent, Doomsday, struck each other for the last time, shattering the front of the Daily Planet in the heart of a decimated metropolis. He captured the two characters hitting the street and the shocked reaction of the surrounding onlookers. Jurgens presented a moment a determined and fatalistic Superman embraced a desperate and frightened Lois Lane, shrouded in steam and smoke before the final, tumultuous cataclysm. Jurgens was responsible for all of the editions of Superman, the most popular of the four titles at the time (the others being Superman: Man of Steel, Adventures of Superman and Action Comics) and a Justice League of America issue in the story arc in which Doomsday took apart the current members. In the intervening time, the Death of Superman has become an irrelevancy – not least because of his return a year later – and even a joke but at the time the images of Superman’s cloak ripped and torn on a post in the heart of Metropolis made world news. At the centre of the story was the writing and assured artwork of Dan Jurgens.

Dan Jurgens, born June 27, 1959 is an American comic book writer and artist with a clear, concise and uncomplicated style that has earned him a reputation as a safe pair of hands. He is best known for creating Booster Gold (present in the JLA taken apart by Doomsday in ’93) and his lengthy runs on the Superman titles Adventures of Superman and Superman (Vol.2). In spite of this notable writing and artistic accolades, making news globally with the death of arguably the most iconic hero in comics, he appeared in books that , perhaps unsurprisingly, never reached the same level of popularity and critical acclaim. These included The Sensational Spider-man, Captain America, Thor (Vol 2), Justice League America, Metal Men (Limited Series), DC Crossover Zero Hour, Tomb Raider. Aquaman and the creator of DC Comics’ imprint Tangent.

Jurgen’s started out in comic books for DC Comics on Warlord 63 following a recommendation from Warlord series creator Mike Grell who was deeply impressed by Jurgens’ work after being presented with his portfolio at a convention. He began, naturally, as an artist for the Sun Devils limited series from 1984-1985 with Gerry Conway and Roy Thomas. Jurgens’ took on a writing role as he scripted from Conway’s plots and took over the writing duties fully within 2 months (artist for issue 8, writer/artist by issue 10).

His successes in his early career were with DC – Jurgens is credited with creating Booster Gold, who became a member of the Justice League, whom Jurgens wrote and drew with the introduction of Doomsday in his rampage to reach Gotham City. As to who created Doomsday, this remains a mystery. He has enjoyed successes with other companies, namely Dark Horse – with Superman vs Alien – and Sensational Spider-man during the Ben Reilly period with Marvel.

But it was with DC that Jurgens proved most notably to be a safe hand. He pencilled and wrote the wide scale Zero Hour crossover in the mid nineties which incorporated all of the DC Universe in a rarely coherent and accesable storyline that tied the threads of a faily convoluted universe together well enough for laymen to understand what was going on – something perhaps only recently valued by DC with the recent title relaunches. This is perhaps Jurgen’s greatest strength. His style assured and uincomplicated, Jurgens presents very clerly the events being portrayed in any series he involves himself in. A less stylistic artist than most, it can be arged he lacks flair which is perhaps why he hasn’t been hailed in the same way as others. But his line work and naturalistic style is as distinct and effective as George Perez and more so than old hands like Jerry Ordway yet fresh and clear. Relatively timeless, it is often difficult to place Jurgen’s work into a particular period if you are unfamiliar with the storyline he is working on. It is a hard case to push to place Jurgens among legends but he is the professional Practitioner, hard working and diligent, efficient and clear – and perhaps unusually – unselfish in his style. His is a page of creative draftmanship, and his pride is in the simple imparting of feelings, ideas and story – setting him apart from the many peers of his that arew notable for their distinct style. Jurgens is a legend because he appears not to be. His stories live on in legend where his name, perhaps, does not. Surely, when a true artist is pressed that is the value of his work and for me, it is something that Jurgens represents. Unsurprisingly, without even trying.

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s