September 2011

Dropping Science: Tempest Milky Way

I figured it had been a while since we last had some stunning footage of the night sky. Fortunately I recently discovered this video by Randy Halverson which easily sits alongside some of the very best such videos. As always, here’s a little bit from the man himself:

One of the challenges in making this video, was trying to get good storm with stars shots. The opportunity doesn’t come along very often, the storm has to be moving the right speed and the lightning can overexpose the long exposures. I had several opportunities this summer to get storm and star shots. In one instance, within a minute of picking up the camera and dolly, 70mph winds hit. One storm was perfect, it came straight towards the setup, then died right before it reached it.

As a special Easter egg , pause the video around the 1:57 mark for a glimpse of a Whitetail Buck appearing on the horizon. The animal poked around near the camera for about 10 mins but when translated to the full speed film, it’s gone in a flash.

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The Extraordinary Tales of Monsieur Poppaleux #24 – Damn You Auto-Correct!

ATTENTION! It has come to the attention of the Jean-François Bacharach memorial fund, that certain copies of The Extraordinary Tales of Monsieur Poppaleux may have contained printing errors. While only minor in nature, it is possible that these errors could lead to a tainted reading of  Dr Bacharach’s work. We apologise for the misprint and are now happy to present you with the correct version of the comic. Rest assured that changes have been implemented in our publishing department to ensure such errors do not occur again. C’est bob. 

Fallen Heroes 2, Page 2: Full Preview

Page 2 of the upcoming second issue of Fallen Heroes, due to be released at Thought Bubble in November. Work continues apace on the collected edition of Unseen Shadows, featuring 5 of its central characters (Ben Ashodi (The Hand), Clancy Wallencheck, Napoleon Stone, Stephanie Connisbee) in one shot stories in one tome. Featuring work from Dan Thompson, Pete Rogers, Richard Clements, Cy Dethan, Corey Brotherson, Roy Huteson Stewart, Rob Carey, Conor Boyle, Cormac Hughes, Gat Melvyn, Vicky Stonebridge, Paul Mclaren, Nic Wilkinson and myself (Steve Penfold).

Check out www.Unseenshadows.com for more deets.

Farewell to Steve Jobs…With Rap!

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ia4joyGYG_A&w=640&h=390]

Given that our company is, like so many others, powered by Apple products (specifically 2 iPhones, Steve’s behemoth of a Mac and a post about iPads which generates far more hits than the amount of research I put into it probably deserves) I kinda feel like we should have at least acknowledged  the departure of Steve Jobs from the company. If you think of the rise of digital comics as being something tied directly to the rise of the iphone and ipad (which I do) then it becomes hard to overstate just how much influence he’s had on our industry.

Fortunately comedy rap group Pantless Knights have chosen to honour him in the only way that seems appropriate, they’ve re-recorded Jay-Z’s What More Can I Say as a tribute to the man himself. It’s as good a parody song as you’re going to hear and a touching send off for the man who left us all standing on the tube, screaming at some fictional birds because they can’t take down some obnoxious pigs.

Godspeed Steve!

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Star Wars Auditions: Carrie Fisher

Princess Leia was a little feistier by the time Carrie Fisher hit the big screen but then when you’ve been asked to lose 10 pounds to get the part it’ll give you a little kick in the butt. Definitely, the chemistry between Ford and Fisher is right there. Hard to believe that Ford wasn’t automatically the first choice for Solo. But then Lucas isn’t everyone’s first choice for Star Wars movies. 😉

Practitioners 41: Erik Larsen

If Simon Bisley is the Heavy Metal and Neil Gaiman the careful lyricism, Erik Larsen is the rock and roll of comic books. Bold colours, flash bang visuals, heavy weaponry, implausible chicks, nasty ass comic book violence and a great hero rising through the pile of body parts and big boobs. Creating a middle ground for those becoming disillusioned with the ‘big ones’ homogenised, careful storytelling, Larsen grinds the pulpish, the extreme and the deliberately silly and offensive together in a cathartic throw back to comics pulp heyday in an unapologetic, hedonistic and ultimately downright fun experience. Recognising that a page is an empty space, pregnant with possibilities, the only limitation – the edges of the artist and writers’ imagination.

Even in the boom days of the nineties, the average comic book geek was under the age of 12 or most likely a social pariah. To these people, escapism was characters that did what they wanted, represented ideals they believed in, got the busty girl and were never intimidated by a sky full of Martian space ships. These readers had a well developed silly bone and an understanding of pulp humour. The readership wasn’t frightened of a book that revelled in random events in the name of kitsch entertainment. This escapism saw heroes appear that were bright, bold, unremitting and smart mouthed. Cartoon heroes for Saturday morning television, made untransmittable before 10PM EST. Erik Larsen was the king of this. A master of crazy, bombastic pulp.

Larsen was born in middle America in Minneapolis, Minnesota. As a child growing up in Bellingham, Washington and Albion, California he created several versions of a character named ‘The Dragon’, a batman like character, driving a car copied from Speed Racer’s Mach 5. Producing a fanzine with a friend which featured ‘The Dragon’ the character was developed into a character able to change using a magic word like Captain Marvel.

Taking his first paid work, working on Megaton, co-creating and illustrating a feature called ‘Vanguard’ with publisher Gary Carlson. The Dragon appeared, slightly revised in the second edition. Larsen went on to work on the Sentinels of Justice for AC Comics and DNAgents for Eclipse Comics.

His work at DC included The Outsiders, Teen Titans, Adventures of Superman and Doom Patrol. For Marvel he completed a The Amazing Spider-man fill-in story and 5 issues of the Punisher. Frankly Larsen made it look easy. Wandering from company to company, first working on incredibly diverse titles for DC and ultimately extremely high end titles for Marvel. Aside from a Nova storyline cancelled for Marvel Comics presents, his flight up the ladder at Marvel was unstoppable. Alongside his master work, as writer and artist on Savage Dragon, Larsen has found an occasional home with Marvel, returning to write and illustrate on Fantastic Four, The Defenders, Wolverine and Nova. He briefly returned to DC to write Aquaman.

Just a selection of the alternate Dragons from the incredibly wild Larsen Universe (by Art Adams)

In 1990, Todd McFarlane was leaving the title Amazing Spider-man, a title he had visually revolutionised and Larsen took over the reigns as of 329, having previously pencilled issues 287, 324 and 327. With writer David Michelinie and Larsen, the series experienced increased sales, with stories such as ‘ The Cosmic Spider-man’, ‘The Return of the Sinster Six’ and ‘The Powerless Spider-man’ that deliberately took off the gloves Spider-man had been treated with. Larsen kept pace with the extreme nature of the story lines, Mary Jane never looking sexier, the character numbers and speed and occurrence of events break neck.

It was during ‘The Return of the Sinister Six’ and before ‘The Dragon’ found his place among the comic book elite that Larsen cemented his place as a true Practitioner. During the production of the book his house was destroyed by flood. While trying to deal with this situation he never missed a page, or reduced the quality of his work – instead accepting an offer by Marvel to reduce the page numbers for two months and fill with back stories. Larsen’s enthusiasm and strength of character bled through here as the rendering of the characters and storylines never missed a beat. Doc Oc swung menacingly into view and epic conflict between multiple characters played out across page after page. Had it not been mentioned in the collected graphic novel, no one would have ever have guessed what was taken place. Not only that, but the faith and help offered by Marvel, a large corporate company, was willing to move mountains to see Larsen complete the project – such was his popularity at the time. His influence on one of the most popular books in comics history, exceptional even in a field of high selling books, places him retrospectively among the greats. But the best was still yet to come. A bawdy, violent, crazy and personally driven comic, seeing his childhood creation fall into the hands of millions of readers around the world. Image had been born under McFarlane and Larsen was going to prove a true linchpin and the very epitomy of the companies ethos. Creator owned and creator driven books were to be given an icon. And that icon was the absurdly named Savage Dragon.

Shedding ideas like an enthusiastic 8 year old, completely unafraid of running out of original material, Larsen took readers on a roller coaster ride experience. Pneumatic vixens and wild mutant monsters crowded the streets of Savage Dragon’s home town Chicago, while Larsen was the man to pull back together the Sinister Six (a combination of all the worst enemies of Spider-man) in New York for Marvel. Artist, script writer, plot and character designer – Larsen could barely contain his ideas on the page. This was what Image had been formed for and Larsen was about to take it by storm.

Seeking greater control and profit over the work they created, Larsen and six other illustrators abandoned Marvel to form Image Comics, where Larsen finally gave his childhood creation life in the form of the fin-headed, green super-cop, The Savage Dragon. This time a massively-muscled green amnesiac who joins the Chicago Police Department after being found in a burning field with no memory of how he ended up there. After a series of self-published redesigns of the character, the stripped down version of the Dragon was given a three issue limited series in 1993, expanding to a full length ongoing series completely under the control of Larsen. Astonishingly, in self-publishing, Larsen has maintained a reasonably consistent monthly schedule (excluding a couple of occasional lapses) in comparison to the other Image titles. Larsen describes Dragon as the missing like between Marvel and Vertigo, aimed at older Marvel readers ready to throw in the towel on comics altogether. And in this he has pitched it perfectly. With a much more adult view, the Savage Dragon bridges the gap neatly between the teen orientated Marvel and the devoutly adult Vertigo titles.

If in any doubt as to why Larsen belongs among the hall of Practitioners, here it is. One of the brave and the bold to leave the relative safety of Marvel behind in order to self publish, Larsen’s title, The Savage Dragon, is the only title in the original line-up (besides Spawn) to still continue to exist and the only one still created by its creator. Image was built on Larsen’s ideals and he has proven that he always intended to see his dream through – marking him out as perhaps the most diligent, determined and honest creator to have left Marvel in the ’90s. Add to that his unnatural talent, enthusiasm and sense of humour and you have a natural comics talent with no time for the limitations of modern books. Larsen will continue to do it his way. Exotic women, massive guns and superheroes with Chicken heads prevail and the day Larsen stops doing that, a little light on an era that harks back to the beginning of comics will go out. Until someone finds a copy of Savage Dragon….

Dropping Science: Chatbot Meets Chatbot, Confusion Ensues

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnzlbyTZsQY&w=640&h=390]

 

Most of us are familiar with the concept of a chatbot. It’s basically a piece of software designed to listen to questions and generate plausibly “human” answers from a set of pre-assigned responses. Much like the famous man vs machine Chessbot contests, Chatbot designers are always striving to create a bot that is able to pass as human.

By adding enough variables it’s possible to create bots that can put on a pretty good show of answering anything a human can throw at it. This of course leads to the question of what happens when you point two such dark mirrors at one another. Well, some folks at Cornell Creative Machines Lab decided to put it to the test and it turns out that the result is a mixture of philosophy, petulance and unicorns…yes, unicorns.

The Cylon war is still a ways off, I fear.

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The Extraordinary Tales of Monsieur Poppaleux #23 – Assimilation Spares Not The Jolly

In 1993, famous Belgian author and spring onion connoisseur, Dr Jean-François Bacharach created a series of books for children. The aim of the project was to use state of the art digital technology to educate and inform on a wide range of topics from maths and theology to poetry and tennis. Using pioneering clip-art techniques, he produced a staggering portfolio of work that continues to be widely distributed in schools across the world and Belgium. Sadly DrBacharach himself was eventually imprisoned due to his being ahead of his time and because he killed a quite staggering number of cats. However his work lives on here at the Bunker! We have secured the entirety of Dr Bacharach’s monumental work and now present it to you. C’est formidable!


Fallen Heroes 2 Preview

As previews are now readily available on www.unseenshadows.com we can post them up here for viewing by the assembled Bunkerites. We should be in that nice little tunnel on the run up to the project going to print for us to post up something every week so watch this space.

Fallen Heroes 2 will be available at Thought Bubble for anyone who’s going. See you there.

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