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Before They Were Famous: Lord of the Rings Bloopers

While a minor production of a fantasy novel was being knocked together some years ago in the misty and rainy hills of New Zealand some were messing about with cameras. The good nature displayed throughout just about nails the heart and feeling that came pumping out the cinema screen along with Orc blades and arrows.

As expected, Sir Ian McKellan reveals himself as the fool of the set, grabbing the close-ups whenever one is mentioned. But in real terms every thing in this low res video apparently shown first on an NZ news channel only reinforces the heartwarming creativity and sense of fun and camaradarie that made the Fellowship what it was. Whatever, it’s funny!!

Practitioners 6: Patricia Mulvihill

As a catch up for all new visitors to Beyond the Bunker, we’ll be representing the original Practitioners series 1-55 (Simon BisleyChris Bachalo and featuring the most influential comic creatives in history). Thoroughly incomplete but featuring legends like Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Frank Miller and Alan Moore already more will be hitting the site every two alternate weeks. For now though, sit back every Tuesday for a run-down of the men and women who created the comic industry we know today. (Or check the full list in the menus above). This week: 100 Bullets and Loveless clourist and long-running Azzarello creative partner, Patricia Mulvihill.

Admittedly, occasionally there is a pecking order in comic books. The content and context attributed to the writer and the visual acuity always attributed to the artist (penciller) with the remaining accolade available to the inker- presuming its not also the penciller. However, one relative unknown in the comics industry enhanced the shape of an already exceptional series created by Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso. While her name never appeared on any front covers of the 13 Graphic novels generated by its run, 100 Bullets would never have been so affecting and impressive a read for the reader without the skills of Patricia Mulvihill.

Taking the lines of Eduardo Risso – and taking on the torch passed by Grant Goleash after issue 15 of 100 Bullets (that ultimately ran for a further 85) – Mulvihill emellished and enhanced the contours and shapes formed by the stark black and white detail of Risso’s inks. With a simplistic and uncluttered layout it is perhaps too easy to overwhelm and distract from the artwork but Mulvihill brought the artwork into even greater focus with an advanced and misleadingly simple-looking palette of colours. A profound understanding of the correct use of opposing shades and colours – simple environments – even those rendered by an artist such as Risso – were converted into emotional spaces. Ignoring conventional lighting and tonal rules a powerful display of colours was applied generating tension, clarity, danger, fear, wonder and languishing emotion and lust. It is a true professional who makes something so delicate and precise look so infinitely simple and I believe Patricia Mulvihill deserves recognition for her contribution.

Moon 2: The Promise of Chaos!!

Chaos is beginning to break out all over the pages of Moon 2. Not entirely sure how as initially the script for the second issue was looking clever, funny and a little sombre at times – but what wasn’t picked up was the potential for complete lunacy to break out.

Dan Thompson is a smart, witty and uncanny writer with a real sense for a one liner – something that perhaps hasn’t been as obvious since our main character doesn’t have a mouth. But it’s all there in Issue 2, more so than in Issue 1 as the fallout continues from the explosive first part!!

We can promise a certain number of things and two in particular; a lot of bullet cartridges in part one, with the potential for an explosion or two and a lot of rain in the second half. A lot. The rain has become something of a matter of pride for myself and our colourist Ivanna Matilla. Dan insists the introduction of every foreground rain drop – in detail – was in the subtext (something I’d have to agree with) but the astounding thing is the way Iv has dealt with the scale of the job. Every single raindrop has been recoloured – o astonishing effect and the tone and pitch of the English weather’d make you think Iv was born in Greenwich.

But the big reveal is still unrevealed – namely the killer of Counsellor Hugh Griffiths, now loose and wild on the streets of London town. New meaning to words ‘Baby on Board’.

Mad, Bad but Good: Creepy Sick Clip from the Possession

Well, Sam Raimi’s definitely involved in this weirdness somewhere. There’s nothing he likes better than a spot of body horror. It’s not his hands on the creative tiller. Originally titled the Dybbux Box, known as the ‘Jewish exorcist’ the flick containing this little moment is directed by Ole Bornedal – clearly a man of considerable talent and a Raimi graduate. On top of that, Madison Davenport, the main little actress is pretty great in this scene.

As someone who likes Drag Me to Hell, the bit where the Octopus arms go nuts in Spidey 2 and the Evil Dead movies, I’m looking forward to this. For a comparable project, look how good Juan Antonio Bayona and Sergio G. Sánchez’s The Orphanage was under the tutelage of Guillermo Del Toro.

Moon's Song of the Week: Blowjob For the Blues by Beans on Toast

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vl6nYLJh0H4&w=853&h=480]

 

Nothing on my new music radar has really lit me up this week so here’s something from the vault that you may not have come across before. Beans on Toast is a part time minstrel/part time bar man who is probably most famous for being really good mates with Frank Turner. Beans has supported Frank at several of his gigs including the one night mega concert at Wembley which is where I first saw him. During the Wembley set Beans tried out some songs he’d never done before, forgot the words, abandoned a couple half way through because he was bored and then dived into the relatively modest audience (most people hadn’t even arrived at that point) and demanded they carry him to the bar. In short it was bloody fantastic.

This track comes from Beans’ album “Trying to Tell the Truth” and is the perfect accompaniment for the festival season. If you like low-fi music videos featuring girls with no trousers dancing like your dad, then this is the tune for you.

You can download this track for free from his website.

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BTB Film – Ragnarok Dawn

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X6P1f1H9Dxk&w=640&h=480]

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwo0fqNWYfE&w=640&h=480]

The much mocked (mainly by us) Ragnarok Dawn was Steve and I’s first attempt at making a film together and pretty much the first project we ever did. It’s from the 2 Days Later competition 2008 and is about a group of Vikings who get lost in a haunted wood and have to fight zombies.

If you don’t totally understand some bits of the story then that’s fine because I don’t either and I co-wrote it. That part aside though it does feature some fantastic make-up by Ali Reith and some very cool fight scenes by the talent team of Viking reenactors that offered to be involved. You also get to see Steve stab me in the head, which has got to be worth something.

The trailer however is awesome.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJa3FPQVNTw&w=853&h=480]

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Walking Dead Season 3

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShQz68Zkb3Y&feature=related

Season 3 of Walking Dead is coming and if you had any questions about what might happen, the four minute trailer above will answer all of your questions. Pretty much without any exceptions. To those who read Kirkman’s books you know that the potential for twists and turns is still there but to anyone who hasn’t you can’t help thinking that maybe they’d wonder what hasn’t been given away.

Good to see Michonne wandering out of the dark and the prison coming into view. Terrible things on the horizon, though whether they’ll dare take it as far as the original is hard to say – and potentially hard to watch. Frankly, it’ll be in those moments that the series decides whether it’ll be a legendary insight into the outer limits of human brutality or merely a well put together drama with notes of old school horror. Either way, I’m watching…

Star Wars 'Call Me Maybe'

The Star Wars cast sings Call Me Maybe by Carly Rae Jepsen. Obi wan (Old and Young) and a host of Skywalkers join Yoda and the Jedi for a quick rendition of an otherwise potentially forgettable pop tune. It even has a Mutilingual bit, who knew what Greedo was saying in the Cantina but it was certainly irritating enough for Han Solo to shoot first (answering a long standing question has to who started it).

It’s good that the dialogue from the love scenes in parts II and III have found a half decent. In the mean time, have to doff your cap to James Covenant fgor finding a new way to see the Star Wars movies – even in this slightly tacky way…

Practitioners 5: Eduardo Risso

As a catch up for all new visitors to Beyond the Bunker, we’ll be representing the original Practitioners series 1-55 (Simon BisleyChris Bachalo and featuring the most influential comic creatives in history). Thoroughly incomplete but featuring legends like Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Frank Miller and Alan Moore already more will be hitting the site every two alternate weeks. For now though, sit back every Tuesday for a run-down of the men and women who created the comic industry we know today. (Or check the full list in the menus above). This week: 100 Bullets and Batman artist and long-running Azzarello creative partner, Eduardo Risso.

Following on from the previous feature on Brian Azzarello we’re looking at the other creative that made 100 Bullets what it was – a pivotal, gravitational piece of visceral and memorable power.


Only an artist with the craftsmanship to make a coffee machine a focus in a scene filled with tension and intrigue could have maintained the awe inspiring integrity and scope of a series like 100 Bullets. Every once in a while an artist will simply prove the power of a black line on a white canvass and no one shows the clarity and purpose of line placement better than Eduardo Risso. He is the dangerous surgeon of the practitioners – his knowledge of anatomy, feature and form informing a sharp, efficient and unflinching style that tears the page between pitch blackness and sharp simple colours – a playground for colourists Grant Goleash and Patricia Mulvihill. In a yankee-centric medium Risso is now synonomous with Brian Azzarello and 100 Bullets, however Eduardo Risso is a multinational artist reknowned in North and South America and Europe for his graphic, noirish linework and efficient and poster-natural artwork. As a western reader, embedded in American comic books anyone’d be forgiven for believing his name was made in the US. Not so.

Like a wandering Mariachi, Risso was born in Leones in Córdoba Province, Argentina and started as a cartoonist in 1981, drawing his first collaborations for the morning paper La Nación and the magazines Erotiocon and Satiricon in his home country. In 1986, he worked for Eura Editoriale of Rome, Italy, and in 1987 he drew Parque Chas, scripted by Ricardo Barreiro. The series was first published by Fierro in Argentina, comic history, and then by Totem in Spain, Comic Art in Italy and finally the complete series as a graphic novel in France, Germany, Denmark, Belgium, Holland, Poland and the United States – no doubt catching the attention of comic industry decision makers there. In 1988, he drew Cain, again scripted by Barreiro, again in Black and White giving rise to a clear inking style that was unforgiving to detail. With each new series Risso’s work has increased in clarity and precision.

He is prolific in his work – every year of working on 100 Bullets turfing up other work including Batman 620-625. Most recently he can be found in the pages of Logan 1-3. The canuckle head giving a character that could’ve been born with Risso in mind to Risso’s gritty and dominating style. While 100 Bullets remains Risso’s most prominent achievement (covering 11 years of his working history and earning him an Eisner for Best Artist) we haven’t seen the best of him yet.

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